HIREQ

אִ

SHORT FRONT CLOSED UNROUNDED VOWEL [i]

In unstressed closed syllables, Tiberian Hebrew pataḥ is normally pronounced as a short i‑vowel.

[i]

אִ

Hidayat al-Qari

The sixth place of articulation is the place of articulation of ḥireq, which is the closure of the teeth with force.

Translation from Khan (TPTBH II.L.2.15.6)

EXAMPLE WORDS:

גְּבִרְתָּ֖הּ

[gaviʀ̟ˈtʰɔːɔh]

מִתְהַלֵּ֥ךְ

[miθhalˈleːeχ]

וַיִּקְרָ֨א

[vaɟɟiq̟ˈʀ̟ɔː]

מִנְחָת֖וֹ

[minħɔːˈθoː]

SHORT FRONT CLOSED UNROUNDED VOWEL []

In stressed and/or open syllables, ḥireq is pronounced as a long vowel [].

[iː]

אִ

(in open or stressed syllable)

Hidayat al-Qari

The total number of vowels is seven: אֹ ,אִ ,אֵ ,אֶ ,אַ ,אָ and אֻ. From within these seven vowels the letters ו ,ה ,א, and י are pronounced. From qameṣ, pataḥ and segol ʾalef and he are pronounced, as in עַמֶּיךָ ,עֲבָדֶיךָ and קָשֶׁה. If the he (in קָשֶׁה) were elided, the segol (by itself) would indicate its existence, just as the qameṣ in עַמְּךָ ,שִׁמְךָ and עֲבָדֶיךָ indicates the existence of ʾalef or he in full orthography ... Ṣere and ḥireq indicate the existence of yod, as in עֵינִי, since the yod is frequently written defectively but these two vowels indicate its existence.

Translation from Khan (TPTBH II.S.4.2)

EXAMPLE WORDS:

צִוִּיתִ֛יךָ

[sˁivvˈθiːχɔː]

לְמִינָ֑הּ

[lamnɔːɔh]

רְבִיעִֽי

[ʀ̟avˈʕ]

עֵינִ֖י

[ʕeːˈn]

EXTRA LONG FRONT CLOSED UNROUNDED VOWEL []

In a stressed closed syllable, ḥireq is pronounced as an extra long vowel [iːi].

[iːi]

אִ

(in stressed closed syllable)

Hidayat al-Qari

The total number of vowels is seven: אֹ ,אִ ,אֵ ,אֶ ,אַ ,אָ and אֻ. From within these seven vowels the letters ו ,ה ,א, and י are pronounced. From qameṣ, pataḥ and segol ʾalef and he are pronounced, as in עַמֶּיךָ ,עֲבָדֶיךָ and קָשֶׁה. If the he (in קָשֶׁה) were elided, the segol (by itself) would indicate its existence, just as the qameṣ in עַמְּךָ ,שִׁמְךָ and עֲבָדֶיךָ indicates the existence of ʾalef or he in full orthography ... Ṣere and ḥireq indicate the existence of yod, as in עֵינִי, since the yod is frequently written defectively but these two vowels indicate its existence.

Translation from Khan (TPTBH II.S.4.2)

EXAMPLE WORDS:

תִּ֣ירְאִ֔י

[iːiʀ̟ˈʔiː]

לְהָאִ֖יר

[lɔhɔːˈʔiːiʀ̟]

יַמִּ֑ים

[jamˈmiːim]

אֱלֹהִ֑ים

[ʔɛloːˈhiːim]

SOURCES AND FURTHER READING

Khan, Geoffrey. 2020. The Tiberian Pronunciation Tradition of Biblical Hebrew. Cambridge: Cambridge and Open Book Publishers. §I.2.

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